Video: The making of a public sculpture

The making of: USC Shoah Foundation commissions a sculpture by Nicola Anthony | The story of Jona Goldrich

Remembering Our Father's Words by Nicola Anthony Stainless steel, 200 x 200 x 270cm, 2018

Remembering our father’s words is a public sculpture commissioned by Melinda Goldrich and gifted to USC Shoah Foundation, which was founded in 1994 by Steven Spielberg.

The sculpture unveiling in 2018 coincided with the dedication ceremony for the USC Shoah Foundation’s new home at Leavey Library at University of Southern California in Los Angeles. The artwork features the life story of Jona Goldrich, a holocaust survivor who escaped from Poland during WW2. Jona’s testimony has been sculpted into an artwork.

Sculpturally, the autobiographical account takes on a form similar to that of a memory - we can delve in at any point, and sometimes one part of the story might obscure another. Reading an account as a physical form is akin to getting to know a person and their history: It takes time to really understand and unravel the complexities, you have to absorb it, gaze at it, and look from different angles.

More info: https://nicolaanthony.co.uk/gallery#/...

Visit it: The Leavey Library at University of Southern California in Los Angeles

This video was made by USCs Shoah Foundation and directed by Jeffrey Schneider.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6EoeCQoIW...

The Artist's Year: A timecapsule of 2018

The artist's year in 100 seconds - 2018

A time-capsule of the year 2018 from my art studio - to all the clients, collaborators, and friends who have made 2018 such a great year!

I have selected some of my favourite moments of making art in 2018, more info on all the artworks featured can be found here.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VY4hXmK3HL...

New York Times: Nicola Anthony sculpture featured in interview with Stephen Spielberg

Thank you to The New York Times for this interview with Steven Spielberg at the USC Shoah Foundation, featuring my latest public artwork.

"The centre is packed with video testimonies from 65 countries in 43 languages, along with survivor-inspired artwork, a hanging steel sculpture by the British artist Nicola Anthony incorporates phrases from filmed testimony."

Steven speaks about the foundation's mission to share the testimonies of genocide survivors, and is photographed standing underneath my artwork in the Jona Goldrich Center.

Read full article here.

Find out more about this public sculpture here.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/18/arts/de...

Video: New public sculpture unveiled in Los Angeles

Remembering our Father's Words, a public artwork by Nicola Anthony, 2018

A permanent sculpture on public view at USC Shoah Foundation, Leavey Library, Los Angeles, USA.

Remembering Our Father's Words by Nicola Anthony, Stainless steel, 200 x 200 x 270cm, 2018

VIDEO & IMAGES COURTESY OF USC SHOAH FOUNDATION.

Remembering our father’s words is a public sculpture commissioned by Melinda Goldrich and gifted to USC Shoah Foundation, which was founded in 1994 by Steven Spielberg.

The sculpture unveiling in 2018 coincided with the dedication ceremony for the USC Shoah Foundation’s new home at Leavey Library at University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

The artwork features the life story of Jona Goldrich, a holocaust survivor who escaped from Poland during WW2. Jona’s testimony has been sculpted into an artwork.

Sculpturally, the autobiographical account takes on a form similar to that of a memory - we can delve in at any point, and sometimes one part of the story might obscure another.

“Reading an account as a physical form is akin to getting to know a person and their history: It takes time to really understand and unravel the complexities, you have to absorb it, gaze at it, and look from different angles.”

More info: https://nicolaanthony.co.uk/gallery#/...

Visit it: USC Shoah Foundation, Leavey Library, Los Angeles

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0p7-pEGer...

From my art studio in Los Angeles

Musings from my artist journal:

Nicola Anthony at Allmost Studio, Los Angeles

Nicola Anthony at Allmost Studio, Los Angeles

Recently I asked myself three questions: What is home? What do I need in order to create? And why is English such a different language to American?!

As many have detected from the instagram posts flying out of my art studio in recent months, I have been creating in a completely new city - Los Angeles. This ‘city of angels’ has been my home since August while I spent time installing a new public sculpture which was commissioned to be the permanent entrance exhibit of the USC Shoah Foundation.

The Shoah Foundation was founded in 1994 by Steven Spielberg and is dedicated to making audio-visual interviews with survivors and witnesses of the Holocaust and other genocides, a compelling voice for education and action. (More about the Foundation and the sculpture here)

Uprooting my life for several months was no easy task, especially considering my large suitcase full of inks, and my library of books and sketch pads I like to refer to whilst sculpting. Like many of my international projects it got me thinking about the sense of home, and what gives us comfort - which if you are an artist, is often essential for being able to make work.

It seems that, the more complex and technical my artworks get, the larger my tool-kit grows. However there is something quite delightful about still being so ‘analogue’.

I love the fact that my measuring callipers are rather ancient and belonged to my Grandad Anthony who also worked with machines and metal when he was alive, and my set of compasses are a robust old piece of kit passed down from my maternal grandad who also worked in metal in England.

Unexpectedly, through a sculpture about the story of a holocaust survivor, I found that my own grandparents - who also grew up during the war - were on my mind. Wherever we go in the world, our family and our loved ones are still with us. I am incredibly thankful to those around me who have supported and endured the mad journeys and undertakings of this artist. Perhaps it is this, which gives me such a strong sense of home wherever go?

Like many artists, I am always sketching something or jotting down new ideas, even when focusing on a singular large project. I have come to understand this as part of my creative motor. Even though I could be content simply with a sketch book, I know that having a space in which I can imagine things into existence, is what truly lets my creative energy exist to its fullest potential. Whilst working on the metal sculpture, I hired a wonderful studio near La Brea Avenue, and found myself drawing a series of sketches based on letters of the alphabet. We never know if these ‘doodles’ we create will become full-fledged artworks, or are simply a way of exercising the creative cogs, or of comforting our imaginations.

Meeting Ai Wei Wei in Los Angeles

Meeting Ai Wei Wei in Los Angeles

Whilst in Los Angles, I meet many new artists who inspired me as well as some incredible artists who have been inspiring me for years. All of the glitz and glamour of Tinseltown certainly helps to adapt to a new location, but I must be honest, most of my time is spent wearing safety goggles and workman’s boots in dusty metal foundries and workshops.

So somehow, I have once again managed to survive in a foreign land but with a strange sense of at-home-ness that I truly believe is brought about because I always have amazing amounts of support from family and those who encourage me to be an artist, and I always have ‘art’. Are there other artists and creatives out there who feel at home anywhere they are creating, but only start to feel a bit lost when they find themselves without a creative mission?

There is one thing of course that will always seem jarring and peculiar about the USA, and that is our different language. After several moments of hilarious miscommunication with my assistant Bridget, we discovered and decoded our completely different terminologies. We joke, but they do say that your language shapes the way you see the world, and seeing it in feet and inches and fahrenheit over the past months has been a big adjustment to my way of sculpting and envisioning physical artworks. Thank goodness I have my Grandfather’s callipers to help me translate.

Thank you to everyone who has been with me on this journey - in person and in spirit. More from the art studio soon.

Nicola

UNEXPECTED HAPPINESS

(c)+Nicola+Anthony,+2018,+British+Sculptor,+Unexpected+Happiness,+National+Design+Centre+Singapore (1).jpg

200 STORIES OF UNEXPECTED HAPPINESS BECOME AN ARTWORK

Acrylic & mixed media. 500 x 500 x 300cm

Commissioned for National Design Centre, Singapore


We are all searching for happiness, and in a way many of us are programmed to enjoy the search more than the happiness itself. We are easily bored of our satisfactions and move on to the next desire, fashion or whimsy: never sated and always searching for the next pleasure.

In my research over the years I have spoken to many individuals who have generously shared their stories for me to retell in sculptural form. One thing I observed from these humbling conversations is that those I spoke to who had the most difficult and challenging stories to tell, also expressed the purest sense of happiness and joy. It will always remain unknown how happy we all are relative to each other, but I certainly get a sense that those who found happiness after struggle were the ones who recognised, appreciated and basked in that joy the most - even if it was just a fleeting moment. 

This artwork aims to take a look at those stories and experiences in particular, and it began with a call out on my public research platform HumanArchiveProject.com to anonymously collect stories of unexpected happiness. 

The resulting artwork contains the stories of 200 people (digitally) and in its physical form currently at Singapore’s National Design Centre features four key stories: A woman who risked loosing her sight during an operation and felt an unexpected, utter joy when she emerged and was bowled over by the usually commonplace sight of her colourful garden; a walker who had an unusual moment of setting caged birds free at the top of a hill in Yorkshire and realised the powerful value of of freedom; a young lady who finally found the kind of love which overwhelmed her entirely, something she never expected she would have; and an individual who realised that happiness comes from a sense of connection, from kindred spirits.


VISIT THIS ARTWORK

This artwork is permanently located at Singapore's National Design Centre.

 

PARTNERS AND SUPPORTERS

Thank you to Keepers for making this installation possible, to our organisers, and especially to Singapore's National Design Centre for giving this artwork a home as part of their permanent collection.

Source: https://nicolaanthony.co.uk/unexpected-hap...

Share with me in Unexpected Happiness

Do you believe in serendipity? It often seems to me that the things which occur seem to be just the right thing - even if I don't know it at the time, I do believe that life's twists and turns have their purpose. That the lows help us value the highs. I experience lots of moments of unexpected happiness, small snatches of joy, which catch me unaware. I try to be open to this - noticing when something is wonderful or good, even if it's simply the pattern of a coffee spill that turned out to be quite beautiful - it's up to me whether to decide it's a mess to be mopped up or a chance for inspiration, (or perhaps a learning about the usefulness of coasters).  

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Time is like a river that flows from the past

Underground there are many unseen streams, tributaries and flows which lead into the river itself. On my calligraphy paper this becomes a metaphor for the invisible elements all around us in life that lead to the path we find ourselves on. Fragments from Marc’s poems float alongside the inky river banks.

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Artwork Focus: Saung | Intersection Yangon (2018)

Suspended in mid-air, three delicate paper sculptures strike an ethereal image with intricate shadows cast on the wall behind. Boat-like in shape, with strings attached from the body to the elegantly curved neck, Humming History, Paper Notes, and Arpeggio by artist Nicola Anthony take as their inspiration the traditional court instrument of Burma (as Myanmar was known in ancient times): the saung, a harp carved from the root of a tree and strung with silk.

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Press Release: Intersection (Yangon)

Intersection is an exhibition of poetry and visual art by Singaporean poet Marc Nair and visual artist Nicola Anthony. The work maps an architecture of memory at the junction of three diverse cities: Yangon, London, and Singapore.

The exhibition is travelling to Yangon this March, and has been five years in the making. Both artists journeyed to each city to engage in field research, resulting in the initial body of work which debuted in 2017. Intersection, though, is a work in progress, and new work will be created on site at Myanm/art Gallery.

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Press Release: Nicola Anthony Shortlisted for Sovereign Asian Art Prize 2018

Contemporary British artist Nicola Anthony is very honoured to have been shortlisted as one of 30 finalists for the the 2018 Sovereign Asian Art Prize – the 14th edition of this prestigious prize for mid-career contemporary artists.

The selected artwork Human Archive Project (borders are a human construction), 2017, was made using stories gathered in Singapore and South East Asia, giving insight into 20 individuals who have left their homeland and loved ones behind to work here as construction workers and domestic workers.

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PART PRINT, PART SCULPTURE, PART DRAWING...

There was a moment which made my senses tingle as I saw the final print of this artwork emerge on its gorgeous paper, thanks to the printing experts at NPE Art Residency whilst I was artist-in-residence there. It is my first digital fine art print in a long time, (an exclusive edition of 15, available here). I want to share with you the journey of this artwork... 

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Artworks featured in Auction, Singapore / Online

The Hotlotz Auction features limited edition prints of four selected artworks by Nicola Anthony. There will also be prints from Kusama, Picasso, Marc ChagaLl and local Singaporean artists. Click to bid online here or read on below for insight into the creative process behind These prints…

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Time Flows With Endless Possibilities: A review of commissioned sculpture 'the Flow of Time'

This October, in addition to the Human Archive Project that is her solo exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum, contemporary artist Nicola Anthony had the opportunity to collaborate with fellow Yellow Ribbon Artist mentors Barry Yeow and Kim Whye Kee on a sculptural installation titled Flow of Time.

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KUALA LUMPUR BIENNALE 2017: sculpture at the National Art Gallery

Great soul is a sculpture created in 2014, which has been travelling the world ever since. It has been selected as part of the Field Trip Project exhibition, at KL Biennale.

There will be an artists and curators guided tour and collaboration workshop with KLSKETCHNATION on November 25th. The Biennale will be open until 30th March 2018... so do visit if you happen to come to Malaysia!

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London artist exhibits her Human Archive at Singapore Art Museum

Nicola Anthony, a British artist working in SouthEast Asia, has garnered international acclaim for her work and this year has been working with the Singapore Art Museum, home to one of the most important collections of contemporary art from the region.

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Press: Home team news

Thank you to Home Team News Singapore, for featuring an article about the yellow Ribbon Art Exhibition - this exhibition featured awe inspiring works from our students and mentees, as well as a collaborative artwork by Barry Yeow, Kim Whye Kee and myself. See the original article here

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This goes further than art - this is a life which we could save

As my project with Singapore Art Museum develops and we speed towards the resulting exhibition, I have been honoured to meet, be inspired by, and share stories with members of the Singapore community, including it's migrant workers.

This is a story I wanted to share before the exhibition, because it is one that goes further than art - this is a life of an individual, and he needs your help.

 

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On Trust: Changi Women’s Prison Artist Mentor Programme (Yellow Ribbon Project)

Throughout my practice, I have been fascinated by people’s stories, social memory and oral history. There is a warmth and kinship in connecting with people, hearing their stories and knowing that it took a lot of courage to talk about painful or life-changing experiences close to their heart. To understand another person’s existence, their joys, fears and learnings, forms an inherent and essential part of my artistic approach. Which is why the opportunity to take on the role of a mentor in the Art Programme at Changi Women's Prison is both special and valuable to my creative development.

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Scents of Singapore: a new exhibition

Potpourri – a collection of artworks, which encapsulate the scents of Singapore

11 July 2017 at 7 pm //  until 10 September // Intersections Gallery, Singapore

The word Potpourri refers to a scented mixture of spices and dried flowers that is usually kept in  a decorative bowl or jar and used to perfume a room.

Potpourri also applies to a collection of seemingly unrelated items, to an unusual assortment.

Scents of Singapore brings together artworks  by a selection of artists using different mediums and metaphors to talk about Singapore history and identity.

This exhibition encompasses artworks by nine artists, Nicola Anthony, Eddie Botha, Kavita Issar Batra, Julayla Jallil, Helene Le Chatelier, Madame, Pang, Marc Nair, Tania Nasr.

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